Category Archives: tabata protocol

Use This in Your Triathlon Training…


The Tabata workout training protocol offers a way of maximizing athletic fitness in the minimum amount of time. Because of this, it is ideal for triathlon training.

How To Use Tabata For Triathlon Training

You will want to do the same exercises you will do during your triathlon during your Tabata workout.

Spend four minutes on each exercise every morning; if you are serious about being your best, do another four minutes for each in the afternoon.

Running

Let’s start with running. To get yourself up to shape for your triathlon running, you’re going to be doing eight extremely high intensity bursts of running at maximum speed, each twenty seconds long. These twenty second bursts of intensity and speed are going to be separated by ten second long recovery intervals. This is where you need to try to catch your breath.

Before you start, make sure you’re all set up for injury-free running. Choose a level field, track or quiet street to run on. Make sure your shoes have got enough shock absorbency left in them. Then, turn on your stop watch and run as if the devil was after you.

You need to be using all your physical capacity, straining all your muscles.

When twenty seconds are over, stop. Rest exactly ten seconds, and then do another twenty second sprint.

For your Tabata running workout you’ll have to do this for eight rounds. It’ll only take you four minutes total.

It is vital to not slow down toward the end, you have to keep that intensity up in round number seven, and eight, just as you did in the first. If you’ve done it right, you’ll feel like collapsing on the ground in utter exhaustion when it’s finished. You may even see stars, or throw up. If you do, just clean up the mess, get some Gatorade in you, and prepare to do it again tomorrow.

That’s Tabata. The work is intense, but, the rewards are great.

Swimming

You can give yourself a short break before going on to the next round. Then put on your swimsuit and get out to the pool. Here you’ll follow the same protocol.

For twenty seconds, you’ll swim as if your life depended on your speed. Then ten seconds of rest, hanging on the side of the pool.

Then twenty more seconds of water fury unleashed.

8 rounds, 240 seconds total.

Since you can’t see a stopwatch in the water you may want to ask someone to play timekeeper, or put on an mp3 that tells you when your twenty and ten second intervals are up and it’s time to switch gears.

Biking

Biking is more of the same. Using either your regular bike on safe, traffic free roads or an exercise bike inside your home, pedal madly for twenty seconds, then give yourself ten seconds to just rest. Add as much resistance as you can handle, an incline works very well.

Make sure you keep up that absolute intensity through all eight rounds. Intense doesn’t just mean fast biking. It means really fast biking. There shouldn’t be any way imaginable in which you could carry on a conversation when doing it.

You should be gasping for breath, literally out of breath, as that is the anaerobic state that comes with Tabata, and it is exactly where you want to be.

You should be pretty much dead when it’s done.

The Rewards

The intense bursts of work in Tabata are highly effective for building stamina and endurance. It is during these intervals that the body is pushed to its absolute maximum and is forced to perform beyond its capacity.

One of the most important aspects of participating in a Triathlon and having a successful race is to work on endurance and stamina levels and, while Tabata is grueling it is also very effective to that end.

There’s your Tabata workout for triathlon training. Now get to training!

Zumba Versus Tabata


There are two names going around the exercise world these days, Zumba and Tabata. Both of them can give you results, though they seem in some ways, opposite poles of the fitness spectrum, cold screaming intensity from Japan versus warm Caribbean dancing, they actually work your body in some of the same ways.

Which one is for you will depend more on your goals and on your personality than anything else. Of course, you can always do both. Do Tabata three days a week and Zumba two days a week, or the other way around. They’re so extremely different they make for a good change off routine.

Zumba will take you at least an hour, and to have the full fun effect, you’ll need to enroll in a Zumba class or dance party, as some call it. You’ll get to mix it up with people of all ages, physical shape, and backgrounds, and even learn a variety of aerobic dance moves that put to catchy Caribbean music, will give you a workout before you’re even aware you’re working.

At the same time, if you do really put yourself out there, you’ll have no problem working up a sweat during your Zumba session and at the same time burn lots and lots of calories.

Tabata workouts can be done in classes at the gym or at home with no equipment, other than a stopwatch. Tabata is an extremely high intensity physical training program. You bring yourself to your own personal ultimate level of exertion for twenty seconds, let it drop for ten seconds, and bring it back up for another twenty eight times over.

A Tabata routine only takes four minutes total. Keep in mind, though, Tabata routine can be much harder than a Zumba session just because of that absolute maximum intensity that is required. You have to push yourself, really push yourself, for it to be a true Tabata.

If you can really push yourself to your limits and you can be disciplined enough to do your Tabata routine daily, or four times a week, research has shown that Tabata style high intensity interval training can give decidedly better results than even an hour steady-state training program like Zumba.

However, that doesn’t mean you should write your Zumba off. The plus side of Zumba is the motivation it offers. It’s not hard to make yourself do; you may even be looking forward to your Zumba dance sessions all day. Tabata, on the other hand, requires motivation from within.

So if you have a hard time pushing yourself to do exercise at all, signing up for that Zumba dance session is a really good idea and an important step toward a healthier future. If you’re the sort who can beat your body into doing almost anything, and if you’re serious about being as fit as you can be, try Tabata.

It’s four minutes, after all. How bad can four minutes be?

As you’re lying on the ground dying after your routine is over, you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing you did it and you trained like a world class Olympic champion.

Incorporating Zumba With Tabata

On the flip side, why should you choose? You don’t have to. Tabata is only recommended to be done 3 or 4 times a week max. So you can easily do Zumba on the other days. This will make sure that you have the optimal amount of exercise and that you are not doing a very intensive workout every single day.

So go for it! All you have to lose is fat, and the risk of heart disease!

Understanding the true Tabata


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It is a fact that Tabata can deliver unbelievable results with no time expenditure. Is it really true, and is it something a beginner can do?

Well, yes, and yes, but, there’s something about it you need to know. Nothing in life is free. While Tabata may be the shortest of all exercise regimes—who can beat 4 minutes?

That 4 minutes may well be the longest 4 minutes of your life. If you do it right, it’ll be a 9 on the Richter scale.

richter scale

Think you’re made of stiffer stuff? Izumi Tabata, the founder of the method, first tried it out on world class athletes, and it was really hard for them. He published it because it was so evidently a superior method of getting results, but, he didn’t expect many people to be interested in it. He knew most of us are not masochists, and he knew his workout was one only a masochist would enjoy.

One thing he misestimated—the selling power of quick, and the strong desire many hold to have strong, healthy bodies we can be proud of.

Now thousands of people use what they call the Tabata method. They don’t all get the promised results, but, that’s only because they aren’t doing it right.

A Tabata workout is never supposed to be easy, even for those who are in elite shape.

Many get this part wrong, and confuse it with the typical HIIT intervals, and so the concern is that people aren’t using the Tabata protocol correctly when the 20 second intense interval moves are too slow to bring on EPOC and the ideal anaerobic state.

This typically occurs when the moves are too complicated, or do not engage enough muscle groups to deliver the intensity required.

Remember this concept and you will never be limited in your tabata protocols.

Thanks for reading!

Jeremy

Tabata Tuesday – Intense Workouts For The Abs And Core


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Happy Tabata Tuesday!

The core is one of our biggest assets in stability, balance and it provides a plethora of health benefits. It is important to exercise the core and maintain it at optimal levels.

It is one thing to sweat and lose weight, but, sculpting ab muscles, and strengthening the abs and core requires specific exercises that need to be done on a consistent basis.

Below are some of the best workouts that primarily target these areas.

For best results, you can combine them with high-intensity interval training programs, like HIIT or Tabata for a huge boost in fat burning that will help to reveal those gorgeous muscles that you and these exercise create.

Feet Elevated Russian Twist

This workout involves a rotational exercise that helps strengthen your abdominal muscles, particularly the obliques. It also helps strengthen the hips and the lower back muscles.

Steps:

1. Sit on the floor.
2. Bend your knees, keeping your feet flat on the floor.
3. Lift your feet a few inches from the floor and hold them as you move.
4. With your palms together, position your arms straight in front of your chest, leaning back at a 45-degree angle.
5. Rotate your torso to the left and to the right.

Medicine Ball Leg Raises

This mild, aerobic exercise is ideal for building core strength and toning up the abdominal muscles, particularly the muscles in the lower region. You can perform the exercise two to three days a week.

Steps:

1. Lie down on the floor, with your face up.
2.  With a medicine ball in both hands, stretch your arms behind your head.
3. Exhale and crunch upwards, raising your arms and legs together above your stomach.
4. Position the medicine ball slowly in between your feet and move your body back to the starting position, leaving your legs raised several inches above the ground.
5. Crunch back up to grab the ball from between your feet.
6. Repeat until you have completed the sets required for your routine.

Press Sit-Ups

An extremely challenging exercise, press sit-ups combine bench presses and sit-ups into one intense activity, and when done correctly, results in stronger arms, chest, shoulders, and firmer abs. For this workout, you will need a barbell and a decline bench.

Steps:

1. Do some dynamic stretches and warm up for about five to ten minutes of light, aerobic exercise.
2. On a decline bench, lie facing up with your knees at the top bend and your ankles secured behind the ankle pads.
3. With an overhand grip, hold a barbell, allowing the weight to rest on your upper chest while your hands are spread wide apart.
4. Inhale and tighten your core muscles while you move to a sitting position.
5. Exhale and raise the barbell straight over your head, making sure your arms are well extended above your head and your upper body perpendicular to the floor.
6. Inhale as you return the barbell to your chest and lower yourself back to the starting position.

Reverse Crunches

Crunches are one of the most common exercises for the abs and core. The reverse crunch, in particular targets the rectus abdominis muscle. To perform this exercise effectively, lift your hips only a few inches from the floor and avoid swinging the legs while raising the hips.

Steps:

1. Lie on the floor with your palms down.
2. Bend your knees towards your chest on a 90-degree angle with your feet held together.
3. Lift your hips off the floor, crunching them inwards while you contract your abs. Point your legs up towards the ceiling.
4. Lower your legs slowly until your feet are flat on the floor.

General Side Plank

This exercise is ideal for beginners and doesn’t require any special equipment. It improves stability of the spine and strengthen the core muscles, specifically the obliques.

Steps:

1. Lie on your one side with your legs fully extended.
2. Prop your body up using your elbow and forearm, your elbows positioned under your shoulder.
3. Contract your abs and raise your hips so that your body forms a straight line from your shoulders to ankles.
4. Breathe deeply while holding yourself in this position for a few seconds.
5. Turn around and repeat on the other side.

Now Go Work Those Abs!

Yours In Success,

Jeremy LaRochester

Jeremy.larochester@gmail.com

904-497-4497

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